ANUBIS - Vintage Aromaleigh Eyeshadow

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Ten shades revived from the Summer of 2013 "Ancient Magick" collection. Available in 1/4 tsp deluxe sample jars, as July 2021's Vintage offering!

 

From the original 2013 release:

ANUBIS: A mysterious mauved grey with green highlights and bright sparks of copper and rose.

Anubis (/əˈnbəs/ or /əˈnjbəs/;[2] Ancient Greek: Ἄνουβις) is the Greek name for a jackal-headed god associated with mummification and the afterlife in ancient Egyptian religion.

“Ancient Magick” is an Egyptian-inspired collection of twenty shades. In an array of hues, finishes and effects, the collection is imbued with the colors found in the life, times and art of this ancient era.

This collection was created with the creative input of Kristen’s 11 year old Son, who has been learning about ancient Egypt in school, and is a huge fan of Rick Riordan’s “The Kane Chronicles”

It is surprising that Aromaleigh has never done a collection inspired by Ancient Egypt, because this was a time in which the very first “mineral makeup” was worn by people of all classes. In so many ways, the culture and mythology of ancient Egypt is the ultimate inspiration for mineral makeup!

The blackened eye makeup- Kohl, not only represented the eye of Horus, but also helped to absorb the sun, making it easier to see in the harsh, desert climate. The wealthy and royal decorated their eyes with brilliant blues and greens from crushed malachite and semi-precious stones. Iron ochre and henna provided coloring for the cheeks, lips and nails.

Enjoy our Pinterest board, inspired by ancient Egypt!

Made in the USA by Aromaleigh Inc.

Ingredients: Mica (CI 77019), Titanium Dioxide (CI 77891), May contain: Ferric Oxide (CI 77491), Ferric Ferrocyanide (CI 77510), Tin Oxide (CI 77861), Silica, Bronze Powder, Copper Powder, Aluminum Powder, Tin Dioxide (CI 778161), Calcium Aluminum Borosilicate

NOTE: While we have made all attempts for photographs to accurately depict colors, photography unfortunately does not accurately reveal the depth and interplay of color and effect of these shadows. Also, please note that variations do exist between different computer monitors.